How to hack your exam study

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Studying can sometimes be hard, overwhelming and intense. But with a bit of organisation and a couple of cool hacks, you can minimise the amount of time spent at your desk wondering where to start. Whether you’re racing towards the Year 12 finishing line or studying for uni exams, these six great study hacks from Deakin University students will help you to sail on through to the end of the year.

Use shower power
‘Stick key info on the other side of the shower or in the toilet and memorise it every time you’re there – I can still tell you all the parts of the brain from Year 12 because I did this.’
– Courtney Matthew, Bachelor of Commerce

Race the clock
‘If you’re finding it hard to get started on your study or keep getting distracted, set a 20 minute alarm on your phone and put it somewhere out of reach on silent. By the time the alarm goes off, you will be on a roll with your study and will most likely want to keep going! If not, have a break and then do another 20 minutes.’
– Greta Morand, Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Laws

Make a rainbow
‘Colour-code everything! I kept all my study notes in order by giving each subject a colour, matching folder and highlighters – it just made things make sense and also made things easier to find.’
– Jessie Hayes, Bachelor of Commerce

'Make recordings of yourself reading notes that you can listen to on your iPhone later.'

Michael Tricarico,
Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science 

Talk to yourself
‘If you’re studying a language, talking out loud to yourself, a pet or family member can help make your speaking more fluid and encourages you to think on your feet. Even if the conversation is one sided or half in English it can still be helpful, especially to notice your weak points. Practice is vital in order to do well in your oral exam.’
– Rhianna Walker, Bachelor of Nursing

Get creative
‘Writing in different colours as opposed to writing in black/blue makes your notes significantly less boring to read later and easier to recall (there have been studies on this).’
– Hayden Heatherington, Bachelor of Psychology (Honours)

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